41% of Surveyed Crypto Investors are Newbies
41% of Surveyed Crypto Investors are Newbies 101
Source: AdobeStock/Pormezz

As many as 41.4% of cryptocurrency investors are crypto newbies, and 60% of them declare they have invested between USD 2,500 and USD 5,000 in crypto, according to the results of a recent survey by alternative investment firm Invictus Capital.

“Today’s investor resembles a 35-year-old German engineer named Günther. He derives his crypto investing information from YouTube, because he values learning how to generate high returns on his investment more than the idealism of cutting out the middleman,” the company said in the survey’s summary.

They are referring to the finding that the country with the highest percentage of surveyed alternative investors was Germany, at 14.1%, followed by the US and Spain, with 7.7% and 6.8%, respectively. The UK and Turkey were ranked fourth, both at 4.8%.

Furthermore, the survey indicates crypto investing is dominated by those aged 31-45, with 41.8%, while respondents aged 25 and below represent 25.1% of the total. Investors aged 25 to 30 hold a 22.9% share, while those aged 45 and above represent only 10.2% of the total.

The survey collected answers from some 3,473 respondents spread across a total of 60 countries. Ofir Sever, a PR spokesperson for Invictus Capital, told Cryptonews.com that the survey’s focus was to determine the modern investor profile, media consumption habits, crypto investing sources, as well as investing habits. The survey was carried out online last February and March, and it targeted investors.

Data was sourced from respondents with access to high-speed Internet, with a significant share of responses from the European Union’s member states and Asian countries, according to the spokesperson. Mobile users provided 94% of the responses, with desktop and tablet users generating a further 5.5% and 0.5%, respectively.

The average sum invested in crypto is reported to be USD 2,500 – USD 5,000, with 60% of those surveyed marking this option. 40% also reported investing USD 100 – USD 2,500, while more than 30% of the respondents have also made investments under USD 100.

With regards to the respondents’ professional profiles, engineers lead the way, at 12.5%, followed by tradesmen and lawyers, both at 9.6%, and finance professionals with 8.6%. Among the listed professions, IT is at the bottom of the list, with 1.6%.

The survey’s summary further stated that:

  • 68% said high returns remain a motivation;
  • 54% see crypto investing as a method to future proof their money;
  • 25% invest to mitigate dealing with middle men;
  • 50% noted high fees on exchanges, quality, and volume on exchanges as the biggest challenges they faced.

And speaking of exchanges, 69% of surveyed investors listed Binance as their exchange of choice, followed by Coinbase with 42.6%, and Kraken with 13%.

74% of the surveyed individuals chose YouTube as their preferred social channel.

Meanwhile, almost 40% percent of respondents said that they invest on a weekly basis, 34.3% said they invest monthly, and 7.7% said they invest once a year, Invictus Capital concluded.

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Learn more:

9% of Surveyed US Teens Claim to Have Traded in Crypto

50% of Inexperienced Investors to Hold Bitcoin Less Than a Year – Survey

18% of Asked Americans Bought Crypto, Most Know Only Bitcoin – Survey

Young Investors Drive Increased Aussie Bitcoin & Crypto Investments

Investors Still Prefer Stocks To Bitcoin, But BTC Wins Over Gold – Survey

More Professionals Trust Crypto Than Want To Get Paid In It – Survey

Crypto is Here to Stay, But There is a Twist, Survey Shows

SnackMagic picks up $15M to expand from build-your-own snack boxes into a wider gifting marketplace

The office shut-down at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic last year spurred huge investment in digital transformation and a wave of tech companies helping with that, but there were some distinct losers in the shift, too — specifically those whose business models were predicated on serving the very offices that disappeared overnight. Today, one of the companies that had to make an immediate pivot to keep itself afloat is announcing a round of funding, after finding itself not just growing at a clip, but making a profit, as well.

SnackMagic, a build-your-own snack box service, has raised $15 million in a Series A round of funding led by Craft Ventures, with Luxor Capital also participating.

(Both investors have an interesting track record in the food-on-demand space: Most recently, Luxor co-led a $528 million round in Glovo in Spain, while Craft backs/has backed the likes of Cloud Kitchens, Postmates and many more).

The funding comes on the back of a strong year for the company, which hit a $20 million revenue run rate in eight months and turned profitable in December 2020.

Founder and CEO Shaunak Amin said in an interview that the plan will be to use the funding both to continue growing SnackMagic’s existing business, as well as extend into other kinds of gifting categories. Currently, you can ship snacks anywhere in the world, but the customizable boxes — recipients are gifted an amount that they can spend, and they choose what they want in the box themselves from SnackMagic’s menu, or one that a business has created and branded as a subset of that — are only available in locations in North America, serviced by SnackMagic’s primary warehouse. Other locations are given options of pre-packed boxes of snacks right now, but the plan is to slowly extend its pick-and-mix model to more geographies, starting with the U.K.

Alongside this, the company plans to continue widening the categories of items that people can gift each other beyond chocolates, chips, hot sauces and other fun food items, into areas like alcohol, meal kits, and non-food items. There’s also scope for expanding to more use cases into areas like corporate gifting, marketing and consumer services, and analytics coming out of its sales.

Amin calls the data that SnackMagic is amassing about customer interest in different brands and products “the hidden gem” of the platform.

“It’s one of the most interesting things,” he said. Brands that want to add their items to the wider pool of products — which today numbers between 700 and 800 items — also get access to a dashboard where they monitor what’s selling, how much stock is left of their own items, and so on. “One thing that is very opaque [in the CPG world] is good data.”

For many of the bigger companies that lack their own direct sales channels, it’s a significantly richer data set than what they typically get from selling items in the average brick and mortar store, or from a bigger online retailer like Amazon. “All these bigger brands like Pepsi and Kellogg not only want to know this about their own products more but also about the brands they are trying to buy,” Amin said. Several of them, he added, have approached his company to partner and invest, so I guess we should watch this space.

SnackMagic’s success comes from a somewhat unintended, unlikely beginning, and it’s a testament to the power of compelling, yet extensible technology that can be scaled and repurposed if necessary. In its case, there is personalization technology, logistics management, product inventory and accounting, and lots of data analytics involved.

The company started out as Stadium, a lunch delivery service in New York City that was leveraging the fact that when co-workers ordered lunch or dinner together for the office — say around a team-building event or a late-night working session, or just for a regular work day — oftentimes they found that people all hankered for different things to eat.

In many cases, people typically make separate orders for the different items, but that also means if you are ordering to all eat together, things would not arrive at the same time; if it’s being expensed, it’s more complicated on that front too; and if you’re thinking about carbon footprints, it might also mean a lot less efficiency on that front too.

Stadium’s solution was a platform that provided access to multiple restaurants’ menus, and people could pick from all of them for a single order. The business had been operating for six years and was really starting to take off.

“We were quite well known in the city, and we had plans to expand, and we were on track for March 2020 being our best month ever,” Amin said. Then, Covid-19 hit. “There was no one left in the office,” he said. Revenue disappeared overnight, since the idea of delivering many items to one place instantly stopped being a need.

Amin said that they took a look at the platform they had built to pick many options (and many different costs, and the accounting that came with that) and thought about how to use that for a different end. It turned out that even with people working remotely, companies wanted to give props to their workers, either just to say hello and thanks, or around a specific team event, in the form of food and treats — all the more so since the supply of snacks you typically come across in so many office canteens and kitchens were no longer there for workers to tap.

It’s interesting, but perhaps also unsurprising, that one of the by-products of our new way of working has been the rise of more services that cater (no pun intended) to people working in more decentralised ways, and that companies exploring how to improve rewarding people in those environments are also seeing a bump.

Just yesterday, we wrote about a company called Alyce raising $30 million for its corporate gifting platform that is also based on personalization — using AI to help understand the interests of the recipient to make better choices of items that a person might want to receive.

Alyce is taking a somewhat different approach to SnackMagic: it’s not holding any products itself, and there is no warehouse but rather a platform that links up buyers with those providing products. And Alyce’s initial audience is different, too: instead of internal employees (the first, but not final, focus for SnackMagic) it is targeting corporate gifting, or presents that sales and marketing people might send to prospects or current clients as a please and thank you gesture.

But you can also see how and where the two might meet in the middle — and compete not just with each other, but the many other online retailers, Amazon and otherwise, plus the consumer goods companies themselves looking for ways of diversifying business by extending beyond the B2C channel.

“We don’t worry about Amazon. We just get better,” Amin said when I asked him about whether he worried that SnackMagic was too easy to replicate. “It might be tough anyway,” he added, since “others might have the snacks but picking and packing and doing individual customization is very different from regular e-commerce. It’s really more like scalable gifting.”

Investors are impressed with the quick turnaround and identification of a market opportunity, and how it quickly retooled its tech to make it fit for purpose.

“SnackMagic’s immediate success was due to an excellent combination of timing, innovative thinking and world-class execution,” said Bryan Rosenblatt, principal investor at Craft Ventures, in a statement. “As companies embrace the future of a flexible workplace, SnackMagic is not just a snack box delivery platform but a company culture builder.”

The People’s Bank of China (PBOC) has expanded the trials of their CBDC to the Hainan Province from April 12 to April 25
the-peoples-bank-of-china-pboc-has-expanded-the-trials-of-their-cbdc-to-the-hainan-province-from-april-12-to-april-25

It is reported that from April 12 to April 25, the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) will expand the CBDC trial to Hainan province. This was the first event in an attempt to normalize cryptocurrencies across China. Now the People’s Bank of China has also conducted the test in other provinces.

Hainan Province announces its first-ever CBDC event in an attempt to normalize the digital currency across China

The Digital Currency Electronic Payment (DC/EP) is a fiat currency designed to replace a system of reserve money. Currently in the testing process, but CBDC is still gradually being adopted in China.

Members of the Sanya municipal government, including their employees, businesses, and permanent residents, will be the main participants of this trial. The trial will raise awareness for the digital yuan, foster secure transactions with wide accessibility. Additionally, participants in this trial will receive a 15% discount for every 100 yuan spent on the island.

While CBDC trials continued across China, cities like Chengdu and Beijing have shown promising success. The second batch of trials was announced in Shanghai, Trường Sa, Qingdao, Xi’an, and Dalian.

Currently, the digital yuan is in beta in China. It is being piloted as a retail CBDC. In the future, though, the central bank aims to be able to interact with other countries. The PBOC and the Hong Kong Monetary Authority are currently testing the digital yuan for cross-border use.

Besides, PBOC has included the affiliated banks of digital payments giants, AliPay and WePay, in their trials to increase adoption. Due to this partnership, users with WeBank and MyBank accounts can now access their money using PBOC apps running CBDC. AliPay and WePay together dominate more than 93% of the digital payments market in China.

There are currently 573.6 million users for digital payment platforms in China. This number is expected to increase to 618 million by 2025 showing huge potential for a shopping mall in this market.

Hong Kong-based app-maker Meitu bought another 175 BTC to reach the $100 million in its Cryptocurrency Investment Plan
hong-kong-based-app-maker-meitu-bought-another-100-million-in-btc-and-eth-to-its-treasury

According to the announcement today, the beauty application Meitu purchased another 175 BTC to reach the $100 million mark it set for itself in its Cryptocurrency Investment Plan.

Meitu buys another $10 million in Bitcoin

Therefore, the goal to invest $100 million in the cryptocurrency of Meitu has been achieved. The plan called for Meitu to add $100 million in BTC and ETH to its treasury, both as an investment and preparation for future initiatives. Meitu intends to use some of the ETH to launch decentralized apps in the future.

The publicly traded firm first acquired $40 million in BTC and ETH in early March of this year, when it unveiled its intention to make further purchases. A week later, it purchased another $49 million. Today’s announcement is the final $10 million of the acquisition.

In total, Meitu holds 31,000 ETH (valued at $50.5 million) and 940 BTC (valued at $49.5 million).

Coinbase disclosed in late March that its institutional business facilitated the past purchases, a service it has provided for other public companies such as Tesla. It’s unclear if the latest purchases were also handled by Coinbase.

Meitu is one of the first China-based publicly listed companies to add crypto to their treasury. Other tech firms like Square, Tesla, and MicroStrategy made headlines in the past year for making similar acquisitions.

[Bitstamp] Sameer Dubey joins Bitstamp as Chief Operating Officer

We’re excited to be welcoming another trusted leader from the world of finance to Bitstamp. Sameer Dubey has joined our team as our new Chief Operating Officer.

Sameer brings global leadership in fintech and traditional banking to Bitstamp, where he is taking charge of expanding our operational capabilities as we scale across our global businesses. He is joining us following stints with leading banks such as N26 and Barclays Bank.

At the German neobank N26, Sameer served as the Head of Operations for UK. Prior to N26, he spent over a decade in executive roles at Barclays on their Payments and Cash Management Product team. At Barclays, he also helped the major UK bank take its early steps into the world of blockchain and distributed ledger technology. We recently sat down with Sameer to ask him a few questions about why he chose Bitstamp and how he sees the journey forward.

You’ve built an impressive career at both traditional institutions and neobanks. What convinced you to shift your focus to crypto?

I’ve been engaged with the world of crypto for quite a while. At Barclays, I was one of the founding members of what we called the Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Council, and from that point, I started to see that, in the world of finance, this is probably the most fundamental shift that’s happened for hundreds of years. I saw myself playing a part in this world, so it was more a question of “when” than “if”. I was also familiar with Bitstamp, having been a customer for about four years. So, when the opportunity arose, I knew it would be a good fit.

How do you see the cryptocurrency industry evolving over the next few years?

I think that in a few years, we won’t really be talking about a cryptocurrency industry anymore. It will be another part of finance and innovative crypto businesses will be considered fintechs similarly to how N26 is perceived today. A lot of the groundwork for crypto to fully integrate into finance has already been laid in terms of the market infrastructure and the regulatory frameworks. Now, the trust from traditional players is starting to build up and cryptocurrencies, both as investable assets and as technological innovations, are getting a chance to prove what they can do on the biggest stage.

What part do you see Bitstamp playing in crypto’s evolution?

Bitstamp, from its inception, has been a cornerstone of the crypto industry – I expect us to continue playing that role. Additionally, as crypto merges with finance, the part we play is going to take on new meaning. Part of what makes this space so exciting is that we really can’t know where we’ll be in, let’s say, 10 years. From my perspective right now, I see Bitstamp continuing to provide best-in-class exchange services based on excellent trading technology and outstanding operations. We’re certainly going to build out that core with new assets and trading options, alongside launching brand new services like staking to build out a wider platform. The expertise we’re bringing in now, with leaders joining Bitstamp from various sectors of finance, will be essential on that journey and I’m excited about exploring the future with this team.

At Bitstamp, we’re continuing to bring in top talent and ramp up our global presence. To join Sameer and the rest of our team across Europe, US and Asia, visit our careers page .

The Central Bank of Sweden Released First Study of Digital Currency

Sweden’s plans to create a central bank digital currency might be more complicated than initially thought according to a new study published by the nation’s central bank. It estimated that the Scandinavian country could delay the release of the e-krona until 2026.

How Does a Cashless Future Look Like?

The Riksbank published the results of the first phase of a pilot project exploring an eventual post-cash era and its consequences. The simulation showed that the rapid speed at which cash is disappearing presents ”potential problems.” However, a digital currency under the control of a central bank has the ability to address them.

The project is colossal, and Sweden’s central bank, which is the oldest one in the world, keeps delaying the timeframe for completing it. Initially, the institution announced it will be ready with the task and move ahead with the e-krona by 2018.

The Riksbank now indicated the current pilot project won’t see the light of day before next year. Some more pessimistic projections, though, stretched the timeframe until the end of 2026.

Mithra Sundberg, who leads the Riksbank project in Stockholm, said that it’s vital to avoid settling on the technology before realizing precisely what the digital currency needs to do. The bank indicated it’s not replacing cash and moving forward with the task will most likely require a new legal framework before releasing it.

In the meantime, the largest economy on the Scandinavian peninsula is proud to be one of the smallest users of cash in the world. During the pandemic, cash usage in the country was at its lowest level ever. According to Riksbank’s research, less than one-tenth of all payments in the county are made in cash.

The Controversy From Other Countries

Norway, Sweden’s neighboring country and another mainly cashless nation, also weighed in on the CBDC topic. However, its central bank said there’s ”no acute need” to introduce digital currency yet.

Other countries also spoke about being a first-mover in the field of digital currency. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell recently opined that there is no need to force the process. He noted that the US would ”rather be right than first”.

Sundberg noted that Sweden’s e-krona project still needs to explore the monetary policy consequence of such a transformation. But her team had ”looked at the technical possibilities of being able to charge interest.”

Meanwhile, the Riksbank has focused on a so-called two-tier model. This system will be responsible for the circulation and redemption of CBDC. Michael Lindgren, the technical project manager at the entity, mentioned that this model will allow direct contact between the so-called participants, such as banks or payment firms, and the end-users.

Mark Cuban Praises Ethereum and Keeps Buying Bitcoin
Mark Cuban Praises Ethereum and Keeps Buying Bitcoin 101
Mark Cuban. Source: a video screenshot, Youtube, TMZSports

The Bitcoin (BTC) vs. Ethereum (ETH) debate just became even more complicated thanks to American billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban. He keeps praising ETH as more superior to BTC, but stores much more of his wealth in this most popular cryptocurrency than ETH, aims to buy more BTC, and doesn’t plan to sell it.

In March, he said that ETH is “the closest we have to a true currency,” and now he’s talking about ETH as a store of value alternative as it has “a lot more built-in utility in its organic and native form.”

“Because people are using ETH to buy NFTs, to do more things, and because smart contracts just make it a little bit simpler to do development. And because we’re looking at hopefully a shorter-term evolution to ETH 2.0, […] I think you’ll see there’s more reason to buy ETH right now beyond just being a store of value – but it doesn’t exclude, you know, being a store of value to buy ETH,” the Dallas Mavericks owner said during the recent Unchained podcast.

He added that with Ethereum improvement proposal (EIP) 1559, “everything changes and what happens going forward is going to really impact how people perceive it specifically as a store of value.” Once the proof-of-stake is reached, bringing forth a much higher number of transactions per second, there will be a massive change in the environment, he said, resulting in a reason for some to use ETH as a store of value over BTC.

“I think the applications leveraging smart contracts and extensions on Ethereum will dwarf Bitcoin. Bitcoin will be a store of value but because it has to be done using miners, you can’t just switch to proof-of-stake with Bitcoin,” Cuban said.

Meanwhile, any asset that is looking for appreciation has to be sold with narratives, said Cuban. While gold’s narrative has historically been a hedge against inflation, it has never been that hedge, he argued. Gold’s not actually needed, but the narrative that it’s precious helps build its value.

“And bitcoin kind of is the same way,” he said. There is no correlation between the actions of the US Federal Reserve and the price of BTC, but it’s a “great narrative,” he said. “All assets could go up in price with inflation, and bitcoin could be one of them […] but so could the cost of bananas.”

That said, as a “bitcoin believer as a store of value,” he’ll “make an exception” – he plans to buy new BTC, not spend his existing coins, and use that to buy a Tesla.

Also, recently he said that his crypto portfolio consists of 60% bitcoin, 30% ethereum, and 10% of other cryptoassets.

Reserve currency and global tide

Meanwhile, Senior Commodity Strategist at Bloomberg Intelligence, Mike McGlone, argues that BTC has a better chance to become a reserve currency than ETH. Per a Bloomberg Galaxy Crypto Index April report,

“It appears the narrative has tilted toward allocating a small portion of assets toward the crypto vs. the risks of missing out on the potential for bitcoin becoming the global benchmark digital asset. Adoption of the benchmark crypto as a global reserve asset has crossed the mainstream threshold, as we see it, and the market tide is rising.”

McGlone said that BTC is replacing gold suddenly rather than gradually and this process is likely to accelerate, “underpinning its price for the foreseeable future and magnifying the dollar’s dominance as the reserve currency.”

Bitcoin fills the need for a digital reserve-asset in a low-yield world, he said. Companies like Visa, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley have “embraced the digitalization of money, buoying the process of bitcoin replacing gold as the global digital-reserve asset,” said the strategist.

Most indicators show a shifting global tide that favors bitcoin as a reserve asset, McGlone concluded.

However, despite this tide, ETH keeps outperforming BTC in the crypto market.

At 15:41 UTC, BTC, with a market capitalization of more than USD 1trn, trades at USD 56,572 and is up by 676% in a year, while ETH (market capitalization – USD 239bn) trades at USD 1,992 and is up by 1,074%.

Artemis launches Positive Future global equity fund

The Artemis Positive Future fund is managed by Craig Bonthron, Neil Goddin, Jonathan Parsons and Ryan Smith, who joined Artemis in November 2020. The four worked together at Aegon Asset Management (formerly Kames Capital), where they managed the Aegon Global Sustainable Equity fund. They are based in Artemis’ Edinburgh office and report to the firm’s CIO, Matthew Beesley.

Artemis’ Bonthron: Being different is good, being right is key

The fund aims to outperform the MSCI AC World (TR) index by assembling a concentrated portfolio of quoted companies, typically 35-45, that address challenges to sustainability. These companies have the potential to disrupt inefficient, outmoded business models.

The fund focuses on innovative, revenue-generating, high growth companies at an earlier stage of their development, offering diversification in a sector where large-cap ‘quality’ and ‘growth’ dominate.

Commenting on the launch, Craig Bonthron said: “We believe the best long-term opportunities for growth lie in companies that are addressing the challenges of sustainability. Our aim is to identify emerging companies that are doing this and that are poised to displace incumbents. Leading performance and sustainability are our objectives.”

Artemis adds MacPherson to distribution team

Matthew Beesley, CIO, added: “As always, our focus is on meeting our clients’ needs, and they have been searching for products that offer market-leading returns while making a positive impact on society. Craig, Neil, Jonathan and Ryan have a demonstrable record of achieving that.”

Ongoing annual charges are 0.87% for I-class. F-class is available for a limited time at a charge of 0.5%. It is structured as a UK-registered Oeic.

Does nuclear power have a future?

Why the controversy?

Right from the beginning of nuclear power – the first commercial nuclear reactor was built at Windscale in Cumbria in 1956 – it was controversial due to issues of safety, cost and the long-lived and toxic waste it produces. Even so, nuclear energy continued to expand globally until the 1990s, since when it has all but flatlined. Then, ten years ago last month, the disaster at Fukushima dealt its reputation a body blow. Within days Angela Merkel, previously a strong backer of nuclear energy, ordered all of Germany’s reactors to be phased out. In China the world’s biggest programme of new nuclear plants was put on hold.

How much energy does nuclear provide?

Globally, nuclear power produces around 10% of the world’s electricity, making it the second-biggest source of low-carbon energy after hydroelectric power. But that’s a sharp drop from a peak of 18% in the mid-1990s. According to figures collated by Bloomberg, there are 440 nuclear reactors currently in operation, with a combined electrical capacity of 392 gigawatts (GW). Another 50 are under construction, adding around 15% to current capacity. But that’s not even enough to make up for the 25% of reactors due to be shut down in advanced economies by 2025. Nuclear accounts for a bigger slice in advanced economies – 18% rather than 10%, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA), making it the largest low-carbon source of energy. In the UK, for example, about 20% of current electricity capacity is nuclear. However, half of that is due to be retired by 2025, and all but one of the existing fleet of nuclear reactors is due to be taken offstream in the next ten years. Meanwhile, only one new plant, the 3.2 GW Hinkley Point C in Somerset, is being built, replacing just under 40% of current nuclear capacity.

So it’s in decline?

In most of the world, yes, with advanced economies due to lose two-thirds of their nuclear capacity by 2040. Proponents of nuclear power (including the IEA) argue that it is vital to the overall drive for net-zero carbon emissions by mid-century. Despite the impressive growth of solar and wind power, says the IEA, the overall share of clean-energy sources in total electricity supply in 2018, at 36%, was the same as it was 20 years earlier due to the decline in nuclear since the 1980s. “Halting that slide will be vital to stepping up the pace of the decarbonisation of electricity supply,” it says. Advocates argue that nuclear-power plants aid electricity security by keeping power grids stable and limiting impacts from seasonal fluctuations from renewables, and cutting dependence on imported fuels. In other words, nuclear has a vital role to play as reliable “firm generating capacity” during the decarbonising shift to renewables, and winding nuclear down for misguided safety reasons would be folly.

But isn’t nuclear power dangerous?

The debate about that has long been a battle between those concerned more with climate-change warming (nuclear is carbon-free) and those worried about safety. For pro-nuclear environmentalists, the embrace of nuclear power by China and (to a lesser extent so far) India is cause for celebration. Advocates have long argued that, in terms of the number of people killed or harmed, nuclear power is far safer than other forms of power generation. Since its earliest days, nuclear accidents have killed one person every 14 years, proponents say. Indeed, in 2013, Pushker Kharecha and James Hansen calculated that, between 1971 and 2009, nuclear power saved the lives of 1.84 million worldwide thanks to reductions in air pollution.

But what about Fukushima?

The earthquake and tsunami that flooded Japan’s east coast ten years ago killed about 18,500 people. But the destruction of the three reactors of the Fukushima plant – the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986 – killed only one person as a result of radiation exposure. Moreover, a report on Fukushima released last month by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) concluded that “no adverse health effects among Fukushima residents have been documented that could be directly attributed to radiation exposure”. Future consequences for health “are unlikely to be discernible” and there was “no credible evidence of excess congenital anomalies, stillbirths, pre-term deliveries or low birthweights related to radiation exposure”.

And Chernobyl?

The worst ever nuclear disaster was the result of human errors so “bizarre” that the scenario would have been “thought overambitious by a genuine saboteur”, says Dominic Lawson in The Sunday Times. The Soviet-era accident, which blew a 1,000-ton concrete reactor shield away in a mighty explosion, was the result of an insane experiment in which one of the reactors was made to run at a dangerously low level, the cooling unit disconnected and the safety mechanism switched off. It was feared deaths would run into the hundreds of thousands. In fact, “apart from the heroic Chernobyl emergency team, fewer than 100 deaths have been attributable to increased radiation – and no known birth deformities”, according to UNSCEAR.

So nuclear is safe?

It’s far safer than most people realise, says The Economist. China’s post-Fukushima pause on nuclear didn’t last long: it soon accelerated again and by 2019 produced four times as much as in 2011, with more expansion planned. There’s a strong case for countries such as Britain to follow China’s lead and import its technology. Moreover, modern smaller reactors with lower unit costs are a promising development that can make nuclear cheaper and more flexible. Nuclear power has its drawbacks, but to hasten its decline “is wilfully to hobble the world in the greatest environmental struggle of all”. The lesson of Fukushima is “not to eschew nuclear power, it is to use it wisely”.